Know the Facts about Coronavirus in our Community

Does Coronavirus Spread Outside?

Melissa Bronstein, Director of Infection Prevention and Control, answers our questions about coronavirus spreading outdoors.

May 29, 2020

People wearing masks outside during coronavirus pandemic

As temperatures rise and sunny days grow more common, large groups of people are spending more time outside. Physical distancing and wearing a mask are still the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but it’s important to understand how the virus spreads outdoors.

“Even as the warm weather increases, it’s not the time to get comfortable and lax with adherence to precautions,” said Melissa Bronstein, Director of Infection Prevention and Control for Rochester Regional Health.

Initial phases of reopening have begun across the country, and there are still risks that require health and safety precautions. Health experts nationwide agree that the most important guidelines to adhere to outside are to remain at least six feet from others and continue to wear a mask. 

“Following the correct precautions to stop the spread of the virus still plays a big role in keeping yourself and others safe,” explains Bronstein. “You may encounter people who seem healthy, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t carriers of the virus—so keeping a safe distance and following health guidelines is still as important as ever.”

How does the coronavirus spread? 

The most common way for the new coronavirus to spread is through droplets in the air when one person is in close contact with another person. 

According to the CDC, you can become infected when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks, and those droplets enter your mouth, nose, or possibly inhaled into the lungs.

Read more common questions about COVID-19

Is it safe to go outside?

Perhaps the biggest question leading into the summer is whether being outdoors is safe. When given the opportunity, choosing to be outside among other people is safer than being inside, explains Bronstein

“In the open air, coronavirus particles disperse more quickly than they do inside.”

Bronstein says it’s okay to go outside but avoid crowded areas and any other instance in which you’re forced to be within six feet of others.

Can the wind carry the coronavirus?

“Coronavirus droplets don’t get carried far in the wind,” said Bronstein. “Wind may slightly increase the distance the particles travel before reaching the ground, like if you were to drop something light when it’s windy—it will travel slightly further, but it won’t stay in the air long.”

Bronstein also adds that humidity in the air can help slow down the travel of particles through air currents.

Can coronavirus survive in hot weather?

Researchers from Harvard Medical School, MIT, and other institutions found a reduction of coronavirus transmission in average temperatures above 77 degrees. The study found that each additional 1.8-degree increase in temperature resulted in an additional 3.1% reduction in the virus's reproduction number (called R-naught, the average number of new infections caused by one infected person).

However, the study concluded that the increase in temperature due to summer weather won't sufficiently contain the spread of the virus, and that physical distancing and wearing a mask is always the safest way to stay protected.

Are parks and playgrounds safe?

“Parks and playgrounds are safe, provided that you practice social distancing, wash your hands, and carry and use hand sanitizer regularly,” advises Bronstein.

Keep in mind that public surfaces may have been touched before you were there.

“Touching a surface and then touching your eyes, nose, or mouth imposes a high risk of infection.”

Be sure to consider health risks when deciding on outdoor activities. While parks and open areas are safe when proper guidelines are followed, the safest place to be when outside are areas where you can keep your distance from other people.

Bronstein emphasizes that coronavirus should still be taken seriously. New York State and our community are making progress because people are following social distancing guidelines and wearing masks in public.

Face masks: How to wear, remove, and make your own

Reduced risk is still risk

When spending time outdoors, be sure to continue to take precautions to reduce the spread of the virus.

How to reduce spread when outside

  • Wash your hands before going outside
  • Wear a mask when in public spaces and when physical distancing is not possible
  • Avoid crowded areas
  • Avoid close contact with others
  • Keep hand sanitizer on-hand and properly stored
  • Wash your hands when you go back inside

While there are safe ways to enjoy the outdoors, there are certain areas you should avoid in order to remain protected, like being in a crowded dog park or going to a crowded playground or waterpark.

Keep in mind that those you encounter may not be taking the same safety precautions as you.

Is it Coronavirus, Flu, or Seasonal Allergies?

Recent News

Coronavirus in New York
Reopening with phase 4 has begun in many upstate NY regions including Monroe County. Dr. Michael Mendoza says we need to be vigilant and keep social distancing as the warm weather continues. Get the latest numbers of coronavirus cases.

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Reopening Updates: Coronavirus in Western New York

Reopening with phase 4 has begun in many upstate NY regions including Monroe County. Dr. Michael Mendoza says we need to be vigilant and keep social distancing as the warm weather continues. Get the latest numbers of coronavirus cases.

Read News Article
Information for Alzheimer's patients about coronavirus
The coronavirus pandemic impacts us all negatively, and for Alzheimer's and dementia patients and caregivers, the struggle to manage is even more challenging. Learn what Dr. Marla Bruns of the Memory Center at Unity Hospital says can help Alzheimer's patients and caregivers.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Effects of Coronavirus on Alzheimer’s Patients & Caregivers

The coronavirus pandemic impacts us all negatively, and for Alzheimer's and dementia patients and caregivers, the struggle to manage is even more challenging. Learn what Dr. Marla Bruns of the Memory Center at Unity Hospital says can help Alzheimer's patients and caregivers.

Read News Article
View All Recent News Articles